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This is just a public service announcement for folks who are running the Tyga rearsets... CHECK YOUR REAR BRAKE LEVER STOP ADJUSTER.

I've just gotten my 3rd report from someone who's had the adjuster fall off, which then allows the brake lever to swing WAY too far up... So, look at the bottom of your rear brake lever. If you see the adjuster. Then my recommendation is, take it out, apply (blue) Loctite, and put it back in place.

If you see a threaded hole, and nothing else... like this:
AWOL_Adjuster.jpg
well... you've lost your adjuster.

To fix the problem, you just need to make a small tab of metal. It doesn't need to be much, as it's just holding back the strength of the return spring... so something on the order of 5mm wide and 12 mm long. Drill a clearance hole on the end, and run a bolt up and into the bottom of the lever. Swing the length out sideways, such that it contacts the bottom of the footpeg hanger, apply Loctite, and presto... you're pedal won't go swinging WAY high anymore, and will be there when you go to use it.

This bolt MUST have Loctite on it, There has been a change on the side of Tyga, and has been in place for a few months now... which is that on initial assembly they are now putting the bolt in with Loctite, in case folks aren't adjusting the position of the brake lever when doing the initial installation. For anyone who's running the rearsets tho, that might not have put Loctite on the adjuster when they installed their rearsets, this is something folks should check.

If your adjuster has fallen out, and your pedal is swinging high / flopping about from the return spring, and don't want to try making a replacement yourself, let me know and I can make something up for you in the machine shop here. Tyga doesn't offer this up as an individual replacement part however. Turns out, replacement brake levers don't even have that piece on them. I'll check into seeing if that can be changed also.
 

ToraTora

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Reading this made me laugh, because with two strokes singles reving around 13K plus things are always coming loose due to vibration. The rear brake lever being a major culprit--even with thread lock. :)
 

octaneguy

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Thanks for the PSA. I was that third customer with the lost adjuster. I had my local KTM dealership do the install of my rear sets, and wasn't even aware of this part until I kicked it and the rubber boot fell off. Good thing is that I'm now aware of this part as well as know that I can adjust the position of the brake lever as it seemed impossible to press in the position it was in.
 
I know this is an old thread, but having installed these recently, I thought I'd add to it.

Seems Tyga is now loctiting the brake lever adjuster. However, they're using red loctite (permanent), which makes "adjustable" a very a very loose term. Even worse, the brake lever comes in a position that is terribly un-ergonomic (at least mine did). At full brake, it's almost straight down. You'd need to have some pretty flexible ankles just to use your rear brake.

The bolts are also surprisingly soft, so before I found out about the red loctite, I stripped the head. I have a good set of tools, so this wasn't a huge problem. However, it'd be much easier to handle, if it wasn't already on the bike.

To anyone who orders these: I highly recommend that before installing them, hit the adjustment screw with a torch (or other method of heating) and remove it. Clean off the loctite and pop it back in. After the rearsets are on the bike, make your adjustments till it's comfy, mark the position however you please, and then apply BLUE Loctite.
 

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Yeah, we switched to Loctite after customers complained about it coming loose or losing it. This is the first I've EVER heard of anything like this with the adjustment being in a bad position. The adjuster sets the position at the top of the stroke at the return point. The lever travel being THAT far tho, sounds concerning. You SHOULDN'T be able to move the rear brake lever NEARLY that far. Are you sure you bled the line well after loosening and rotating the banjo bolt? When I crack it open to install, I start with the system under pressure, loosen it JUST enough to turn, and then pump it again as I'm tightening. You'll lose a small amount of fluid, but it's not enough to even worry about... Maybe a quarter teaspoon.
 
I lost a very small amount of fluid, but not enough to worry about. But my adjuster was all the way out and pretty uncomfortable before depressing, so it had to be adjusted regardless. But you're right, I may have had a little extra travel in there. I've got the starting position set where I want now, so going to take care of the engaged position today. So that'll be adjusting the positions and giving it a good bleed.

But red loctite is a poor choice for anything that's supposed to be adjustable. You need to heat it up to 550F to break it loose. Finding that out when it's on the bike is unpleasant.

My opinion: since any loctite will likely be broken at first adjustment anyway, I'd send it with none at all (or maybe blue, in case someone skips adjustment), and make it very clear in the instructions that that screw should be loctited. The loctite will need to be reapplied as soon as someone adjusts it anyway. There's also convenient options, like a locking helical coil insert. It'd be great for most, unfortunately the locking coil has a life span of like 6-8 removals, so anyone who regularly adjusts their rearsets between a street and track setup would eventually run into issues. Those who adjust once or twice to find their sweet spot, would be very happy. No loctite required.

Unrelated opinion: I sheared off the nut on the adjuster while trying to adjust it. It seemed like it was tack welded on, but the arm is threaded as well. Maybe the nut is just to get a few more threads engaged? Anyway, I threw out the nut and the bolt, and drove a set screw through the bottom of the arm. It can be adjusted easily on the bike, looks a little cleaner, and would probably be cheaper to make. Just an idea, I thought I'd throw your way.
 

Formula390

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I lost a very small amount of fluid, but not enough to worry about. But my adjuster was all the way out and pretty uncomfortable before depressing, so it had to be adjusted regardless. But you're right, I may have had a little extra travel in there. I've got the starting position set where I want now, so going to take care of the engaged position today. So that'll be adjusting the positions and giving it a good bleed.

But red loctite is a poor choice for anything that's supposed to be adjustable. You need to heat it up to 550F to break it loose. Finding that out when it's on the bike is unpleasant.

My opinion: since any loctite will likely be broken at first adjustment anyway, I'd send it with none at all (or maybe blue, in case someone skips adjustment), and make it very clear in the instructions that that screw should be loctited. The loctite will need to be reapplied as soon as someone adjusts it anyway. There's also convenient options, like a locking helical coil insert. It'd be great for most, unfortunately the locking coil has a life span of like 6-8 removals, so anyone who regularly adjusts their rearsets between a street and track setup would eventually run into issues. Those who adjust once or twice to find their sweet spot, would be very happy. No loctite required.

Unrelated opinion: I sheared off the nut on the adjuster while trying to adjust it. It seemed like it was tack welded on, but the arm is threaded as well. Maybe the nut is just to get a few more threads engaged? Anyway, I threw out the nut and the bolt, and drove a set screw through the bottom of the arm. It can be adjusted easily on the bike, looks a little cleaner, and would probably be cheaper to make. Just an idea, I thought I'd throw your way.
You are making the assumption that people read all of the instructions, or read them at all. In practice, that turned out to NOT be the case, as such we ended up with a lot of guys loosing the rear brake lever stopper adjuster. The lever would then go ALL the way up, and they would then loose the plunger, spring, and sometimes the boot as well. So we asked the community for feedback and gave the option of using Loctite. Most everyone wanted the adjuster to be setup with Loctite already on it, so that's the way we went with that. Initially we tired using blue, but either from people adjusting it and then not re-applying, or it somehow managing to rattle it's way free, we switched over to using RED. That was also because we were finding that for 99% of riders, they never even touched the adjustment. This is in fact the first report we've EVER gotten on anyone finding a problem with it, or with anyone having a problem with us having used red Loctite. It might be that the adjuster was somehow not set in the correct location at the factory, and I've started a discussion with them on the matter. As I said, this is the first time I've heard of anyone having any issues with this set at the factory. I know that if the system isn't bled and you get air in the line when you crack the banjo to rotate it, that you can get exceptionally long travel similar to your description of what happened on your bike. Any time I've ever heard of feedback like that, I tell them to bleed their brakes again, and the extended travel goes away, and everything is OK again. The rear brake isn't like the shifter when you have to get your boot under it... so needing a wide range of adjustment is typically not an issue. I wonder if the adjustment on your bike with the piston pusher on the master cylinder is out of adjustment, and that may also be why your lever is traveling so far. There are two adjustments to make for the rear brake lever, and the one on the pusher is set by Bajaj when the bike is shipped out. I've installed a number of rearsets here and I've almost always needed to adjust that pushrod for the primary adjustment. The lever stopper is the only part that may need to be adjusted that is a Tyga part, and like I said, we set this initially at the point that is almost never is adjusted... that combined with the issue of Blue Loctite not having been as successful in the field, meant we switched over to Red. I'm sorry this was an issue for you, and as I said I've already started a discussion with the factory about this. For now, I would say, take a strong look at that pushrod adjustment, and make sure your line is completely bled. If you are getting much more than an inch and a half of travel, it sounds like you've still got air in the system or the fluid needs to be changes as it's absorbed too much moisture which again can cause problems with the amount the lever travels.

Rearsets_Adjustment.png
 
I got it all setup now and everything feels good. I think it either came out of the factory with the adjuster farther out (lever farther down) than usual, or I just like my lever higher than most. And yes, after adjusting it up, I had to thread the pushrod out quite a bit.

You are correct. Blue loctite would certainly have to be reapplied after adjusting. That should apply to red as well, but my guess is most people aren't adjusting them. Red isn't meant to move. They even advertise it as permanent without high heat. I actually sheared the bolt in two, just above the nut, before getting any movement.

I'm a mechanical/aero design engineer that designs things for the government that fly very fast, in harsh environments, over 30 year lifespans. We almost never use red loctite. Blue, when applied correctly (threads cleaned and primed prior to application), is sufficient for 99.9% of applications. Red is reserved for when you essentially want them to become one piece and never plan to remove it. There are times this makes sense (like the bolt that mounts the arm to the lever). But we view red as a method of welding dissimilar metals. =)

If I'm the only one who's reported an issue, then maybe it's not worth spending too many calories on solving it. Just be aware that red loctite will pose a challenge for the few people who do seek adjustment. Nylok makes some interesting products that may be a good solution here. I can't claim to have used their stuff extensivley, so I can't speak to it too much. But, I know they make bolts that have a built in locking feature, which would eliminate any concern of people ignoring instructions or choosing to forgo loctite.
 
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